Henry David Thoreau
Presented by The Thoreau Project, a nonprofit initiative of Calliope, Inc.
Phone: 781.674.2926 - e-mail: info@calliope.org
Visit all our subject areas in American history and culture:
Harlem Renaissance Links | The Classic Blues| Shays' Rebellion & the Constitution | The Gold Rushes

Green Thoreau: Global Warming
 

Nature & Science

 
2010 Annual Gathering

 

Postmodern Thoreau

 

A Thoreau Time Line
A Page in Thoreau's Journal
Reading Thoreau
Teaching Thoreau
Best Thoreau Web Sites
Thoreau & the Underground Railroad
Books About Thoreau & His Times;
Book Reviews
Advanced Thoreau Studies

 


Thoreau and Richard C. Trench:
Conjectures on the Pickerel Passage of Walden - Page 3

By Gordon V. Boudreau (1974) - continued

Back to
Page One
Page Two

In order to make the genesis of this passage clear, it will be helpful to show Thoreau's journal entry for January 25, 1853 (Version A) beside the re-worked version that occurs in "The Pond in Winter" in the published text of Walden (Version B):

Version A (Journal)

The pickerel of Walden! when I see them lying on the ice, or in the well which the fisherman cuts in the ice, I am always surprised by their rare beauty, as if they were a fabulous fish, they are so foreign to the streets, or even the woods; handsome as flowers and gems, golden and emerald,a transcendent and dazzling beauty which separates [them] by a wide interval from the cadaverous cod and haddock, at least a day old, which we see. They are as foreign as Arabia to our Concord life, as if the two ends of the earth had come together. These are not green like the pines, or gray like the stones, or blue like the sky; but they have, if possible, to my eye, yet rarer colors, like precious stones. It is surprising that these fishes are caught here. They are something tropical. That in this deep and capacious spring, far beneath the rattling teams and chaises and tinkling sleighs that travel the Walden road, this great gold and emerald fish swims! They are true topazes, inasmuch as you can only conjecture what place they came from. The pearls of Walden, some animalized Walden water. I never chanced to see this kind of fish in any market. With a few convulsive quirks they give up their diluted ghosts (J, IV, 476-477).

Version B (Walden, "The Pond in Winter")

Ah, the pickerel of Walden! when I see them lying on the ice, or in the well which the fisherman cuts in the ice, making a little hole to admit the water, I am always surprised by their rare beauty, as if they were fabulous fishes, they are so foreign to the streets, even to the woods, foreign as Arabia to our Concord life. They possess a quite dazzling and transcendent beauty which separates them by a wide interval from the cadaverous cod and haddock whose fame is trumpeted in our streets. They are not green like the pines, nor gray like the stones, nor blue like the sky; but they have, to my eyes, if possible, yet rarer colors, like flowers and precious stones, as if they were the pearls, the animalized nuclei or crystals of the Walden water. They, of course, are Walden all over and all through; are themselves small Waldens in the animal kingdom, Waldenses. It is surprising that they are caught here, - that in this deep and capacious spring, far beneath the rattling teams and chaises and tinkling sleighs that travel the Walden road, this great gold and emerald fish swims. I never chanced to see its kind in any market; it would be the cynosure of all eyes there. Easily, with a few convulsive quirks, they give up their watery ghosts, like a mortal translated before his time to the thin air of heaven (pp. 284-285).



Previous Page Next Page

Visit all our subject areas in American history and culture:
Harlem Renaissance | Classic Blues| Shays' Rebellion & the Constitution | Gold Rushes
Calliope Home
| Comments? e-mail the Webkeeper

Updated Feb. 20, 2010